THE          HEALTH  and  SAFETY  REGULATIONS 1992

  Council officers who abuse their positions of authoirty should be prosecuted under the Fraud Act 2006, a pension would then be proceeds of crime and not payable.

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Statutory Instrument 1992 No.3004

The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992

 


 

The text of this Internet version of the Statutory Instrument has been prepared to reflect the text as it was Made. The authoritative version is the Queen's Printer copy published by The Stationery Office Limited as the The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992, ISBN 0110258045. Purchase this item. For details of how to obtain an official copy see How to obtain The Stationery Office Limited titles.

 

To ensure fast access over slow connections, large documents have been segmented into "chunks". Where you see a "continue" button at the bottom of the page of text, this indicates that there is another chunk of text available. Dame Butler Sloss is featured in connection with these Regulations because she heard an Appeal in the High Court where the Wealden District Council had, in perversity, asked the Courts to deny Nelson Kruschandl his right to basic sanitation - as part of their vendetta against him and his family.

 

The amazing part of this story is that a female High Court judge actually went along with it - because she appears not to have known that what she was doing was unlawful. Just as amazing is that the barrister defending Kruschandl - also did not know about these Regulations. But the lady judge did order removal of all sanitation from Herstmonceux Museum, just as David Phillips, Vic Scarpa and Christine Nuttall were requesting. Dame Butler Sloss became involved later as the appeal judge, in the Court of Appeal, when Mr Kruschandl filed an appeal. It goes without saying that such malicious actions by Wealden District Council were violations of Kruschandl's Human Right to enjoyment of property without interference from local authority - a breach of Article 8.

 

 

   

 

      Dame Butler Sloss high court judge

 

DAFT OR MALICIOUS? - "Mr Kruschandl, having taken out the toilets to comply with the Order of the Court below, presumably you can then put them back to comply with Health and Safety Regulations." Does that seem logical to you? Surely, the Court below had no right to insist that the toilets were removed. The right to have a toilet is granted to all persons by the State. A statutory right may not be denied any person by a Court. When Nelson Kruschandl asked for permission to adduce a letter from the Health & Safety Executive, which explained the legal situation to Dame Butler Sloss, she refused. "You keep that letter in you pocket Mr Kruschandl." That is what she is said to have replied, or words to that effect. The law is indeed an ass.


FORMER RULINGS

Dame Elizabeth, (85 @ 2014), was thrust into the public eye in the late 1980s during the Cleveland child abuse inquiry which resulted in the Children Act of 1989.

The act incorporated many of her recommendations aimed at ensuring that children were not removed from parents unless absolutely necessary.

 

 

Virgintiy testing for claimants in sexual assault cases should be mandatory 

 

FORWARD - In respect of forensic examinations, Dame Butler Sloss says that more research is needed. We could not agree more. But surely, we need a new law or guidance as to procedural compliance by doctors acting in an official capacity. Dr Melanie Liebenberg is accused of failing to properly (fully) carry out the inspection of a girl alleging abuse, because it is alleged that she must have realised that a girl she was examining was a virgin (unsullied), but that she kept that to herself - concentrating on another issue by way of slight of hand - knowing that that issue was dead. Whereas, the finding in R v Ward - where scientists had agreed to keep secret that a test for nitroglycerine also proved positive with boot polish, was that experts owed a duty to the courts to provide factual findings even where those facts do not support the Crown's case. Ward was convicted of being a bomber on the strength of such junk science and served many years in prison before the establishment realized that she was telling the truth - and referred her case to the Court of Appeal.

 

The ridiculous outfits (Robes & Wigs) that UK Judges wear - in this case suitable fancy dress for the ridiculous judgments that the courts frequently hand out. On that front, a red nose and bow tie would be more in keeping with some of the verdicts. British justice is a mockery, where more than 3% of convictions see innocent men spending time in prison.

 

 


STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS


1992   No.3004

HEALTH AND SAFETY

The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992

 

Made

1st December 1992

Laid before Parliament

8th December 1992

Coming into force

 

The whole Regulations except regulations 5 to 27 and the Schedules, to the extent specified in regulation 1(3)

1st January 1993

 

Regulations 5 to 27 and the Schedules, to the extent specified in regulation 1(3)

1st January 1996


 

ARRANGEMENT OF REGULATIONS

 

1. 

Citation and commencement

2. 

Interpretation

3. 

Application of these Regulations

4. 

Requirements under these Regulations

5. 

Maintenance of workplace, and of equipment, devices and systems

6. 

Ventilation

7. 

Temperature in indoor workplaces

8. 

Lighting

9. 

Cleanliness and waste materials

10. 

Room dimensions and space

11. 

Workstations and seating

12. 

Condition of floors and traffic routes

13. 

Falls or falling objects

14. 

Windows, and transparent or translucent doors, gates and walls

15. 

Windows, skylights and ventilators

16. 

Ability to clean windows etc. safely

17. 

Organisation etc. of traffic routes

18. 

Doors and gates

19. 

Escalators and moving walkways

20. 

Sanitary conveniences

21. 

Washing facilities

22. 

Drinking water

23. 

Accommodation for clothing

24. 

Facilities for changing clothing

25. 

Facilities for rest and to eat meals

26. 

Exemption certificates

27. 

Repeals, saving and revocations

 

Schedule 1 

Provisions applicable to factories which are not new workplaces, extensions or conversions


 

Schedule 2 

Repeals and revocations

 

Department for Environment, Food and Rural Afairs  For examples of best practice and numerous sources of financial assistance.

Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development     Personnel advice and discussion

Inland Revenue                                                         For help with the tax implications of working from home

Health & Safety Executive                                        To assess the safety of your new working environment